Program

HTAV Annual Conference: CHANGING THE COURSE OF HISTORY
Thursday 1 – Friday 2 August 2024 | Jasper Hotel, Melbourne CBD

Earlybird rate ends Tuesday 16 July.
All registrations must close Tuesday 23 July.



The HTAV Annual Conference, themed Changing the Course of History, will feature an impressive range of workshops, lectures and practical seminars that will provide ideas for engaging classroom strategies, activities and pedagogy to help build on the learning outcomes of students.

Learn from experts from schools and organisations across Victoria in an environment filled with like-minded educators. This is an experience rich with insights that you can take back to your classrooms and share with your school community. The evaluation feedback from our conferences shows that teachers advance their subject-specific knowledge and practice by reaching beyond their own school gates.

Join us on an informative and insightful History journey and share in the unique spirit when the History community comes together.

Confirmation emails with session allocations and full event details will be issued during the week beginning Monday 29 July.

  1. Check out the program below.
  2. Log into the HTAV website to unlock your member rate.
  3. Register.

Please note: Members of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities should be aware that this program contains an image of a person now deceased.

Program booklet
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Session descriptions and presenter biographies

Thursday 1 August Friday 2 August

Streams

Thursday 1 August Friday 2 August

Bring your own device

DAY ONE – Thursday 1 August

9.00 am REGISTRATION
9.50 am WELCOME AND HOUSEKEEPING
10.20 am SESSION 1: Please choose one workshop from this session.
T1.1 The ‘Russian’ Revolutions(s): Old and New Approaches to 1917
Professor Mark Edele, The University of Melbourne
VCE REVOLUTIONS
T1.2 Developing Evaluation of Historical Sources Tasks in
VCE History
Ian Lyell, Mentone Girls’ Grammar School
VCE MODERN HISTORY | VCE REVOLUTIONS | BYOD
T1.3 Tools for Engagement: A Practical Approach to Teaching History
Siobhan Shaw, Sunbury College
GENERAL
T1.4 Object-based Learning in the History Classroom
Gurmeet Kaur, Museums Victoria
LEVELS 9–10 | VCE AUSTRALIAN HISTORY
T1.5 Mythbusters: Tackling the Biggest Fallacies in Education
Ben Lawless, Aitken College and Lawless Learning
GENERAL | BYOD
T1.6 Teaching Deep Time and the Importance of Place
Kath Burke and Pete Leete, St Margaret Mary’s College, Townsville
LEVELS 7–8
T1.7 Apprenticing Young Historians
Malcolm Lindner, Pembroke School, Adelaide
LEVELS 7–8
11.15 am MORNING TEA
11.50 am SESSION 2: Please choose one workshop from this session.
T2.1 ‘The Terror’ 1793–1794: Revolutionary Defence or Paranoia?
Emeritus Professor Peter McPhee AM, The University of Melbourne
VCE REVOLUTIONS
T2.2 ‘What Do I Write Next, Miss?’: How to Help Students Build
a Strong Knowledge Base in History
Agata Kula, Bacchus Marsh Grammar
GENERAL | BYOD
T2.3 Perdita Res Publica: The Failed Reforms of M. Livius Drusus
(91 BCE)
Professor Frederik Vervaet, The University of Melbourne
VCE ANCIENT HISTORY | BYOD
T2.4 AI in Education: Beyond ChatGPT and Towards
Transformation
Paul Allen, Ivanhoe Grammar School
GENERAL | BYOD
T2.5 How Can Teaching History Help with Student Wellbeing?
Jo Leech, Carey Baptist Grammar School
LEVELS 9–10 | VCE | INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE | BYOD
T2.6 So You’re an Early-career Teacher (or Mentor to One)
Ashley Keith Pratt, Southern Cross Grammar, and Lyndon John Pratt, Bacchus Marsh Grammar
GENERAL
T2.7 Making History Come Alive in Your Classroom
Michael Kulkewycz, Sirius College
LEVELS 7–10
12.50 pm KEYNOTE SESSION: ‘We Won, You Lost. Get Over It!’
Moving Beyond Truth-telling to Justice in the Australian History Classroom

Dr Aleryk Fricker, Deakin University

The process of truth-telling in the History classroom has become more prominent in recent times. This has largely been driven by History teachers from a revisionist perspective, seeking to explore the untold histories of the forgotten people as a direct response to the ‘great men of history’ mentality that has dominated History classrooms for much of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the Australian context, this has contributed to an increase in the amount of First Nations content but also the troubling nature of the content being covered. Truth-telling has undoubtably had an impact on the History classroom, but possibly not in the ways it was hoped. This keynote explores the process of truth-telling and reconciliation, its limitations, and how the History classroom can move beyond historical truth-telling and into just History.

Dr Aleryk (Al) Fricker is a proud Dja Dja Wurrung academic based at the NIKERI Institute at Deakin University. A former History teacher, he now coordinates the Indigenous Education units across all the undergraduate education programs at Deakin. Al’s research focuses on Indigenous education and decolonising education in Australia so that all students can benefit from engaging with the oldest teaching pedagogies and knowledges in the world.
1.45 pm NETWORKING LUNCH
2.35 pm EXHIBITOR PASSPORT PRIZE DRAWS
2.50 pm VCAA UPDATE: NEW VICTORIAN CURRICULUM F–10
Adam Brodie-McKenzie, Curriculum Manager (History and Civics), Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority
3.15 pm SESSION 3: Please choose one workshop from this session.
T3.1 How to Stop Your Empire Crumbling: Engaging Students
in the Study of Early Modern History
Hilary Tieri, Assumption College, Kilmore
VCE EMPIRES | BYOD
T3.2 Archaeology and Ancient Australia
Alethea Kinsela, Plainspeak Publishing
LEVELS 7–8 | PUBLISHER SESSION
T3.3 Empowering Gifted Historians: Depths and Complexity Approach
Joshua Cozzio, Ivanhoe Grammar School
GENERAL | BYOD
T3.4 Building Cultural Capital in the Middle Years Classroom
Jane Denman and Emma Winton, Nossal High School
LEVELS 9–10 | BYOD
T3.5 Using Egyptomania to Promote History in Schools
Andree Buchanan, Luther College, and Alanna Clark and Astrid Morgan, Victory Lutheran College
LEVELS 7–8 | VCE ANCIENT HISTORY | BYOD
4.15 pm SOCIAL HOUR
Sponsored by



DAY TWO – Friday 2 August

9.00 am REGISTRATION
9.50 am WELCOME AND HOUSEKEEPING
10.20 am SESSION 1: Please choose one workshop from this session.
F1.1 A History of Ancient Australia Preserved in 10 Amazing Sites
Associate Professor Duncan Wright and Dave Johnston, Australian National University
LEVELS 7–10 | HTAV PUBLISHER SESSION
F1.2 Assisting ALL Students to Achieve
Holly Bracken, Bayswater Secondary College
VCE | BYOD
F1.3 Explicit Instruction in the History Classroom
Ashley Keith Pratt, Southern Cross Grammar, and James Sach, Fintona Girls’ School
GENERAL
F1.4 Age of Empires: World History
Louis Goutos, St Joseph’s College
LEVELS 9–10 | BYOD
F1.5 Resources and Research on History Teaching from Europe
Bridget Martin, International School of Paris
GENERAL | BYOD
F1.6 Trailblazing Women Lawyers: Oral Histories as
Teaching Tools
Professor Kim Rubenstein, University of Canberra
LEVELS 9–10 | VCE MODERN HISTORY | VCE AUSTRALIAN HISTORY | BYOD
F1.7 Australia’s Response to the Holocaust
Dr Simon Holloway, Melbourne Holocaust Museum
LEVELS 9–10 | BYOD
11.15 am MORNING TEA
11.50 am SESSION 2: Please choose one workshop from this session.
F2.1 The Consolidation of Empires: Exploring the Key Elements of Area of Study 2
Professor Darius von Güttner, Australian Catholic University
VCE EMPIRES
F2.2 Film as Historical Interpretation
Hollie Griffiths and Cassie Purer, Prahran High School
LEVELS 7–10 | VCE MODERN HISTORY | BYOD
F2.3 Explicit Instruction on Steroids: Disaggregating History
Skills
Ben Lawless, Aitken College and Lawless Learning
GENERAL | BYOD
F2.4 Is This Real? Exploring Object-based Learning at the NGV
Johanna Petkov, National Gallery of Victoria
LEVELS 7–8
F2.5 Practical Ideas for the History Teachers’ Toolbox
Ash Wood, St Leonard’s College
GENERAL
F2.6 Teaching IB History for the First Time?
James Desmond, The Mac.Robertson Girls’ High School
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE
F2.7 Making History Units More Engaging with the New and
Free Adobe Express Tools
Dr Tim Kitchen, Adobe
GENERAL | BYOD
12.50 pm KEYNOTE SESSION: Making Australian History
Professor Anna Clark, University of Technology Sydney

I’ve studied the ‘history wars’ for 20 years, so I know how Australian history has been revised and reinterpreted by successive generations. Each iteration of Australia’s national story reveals not only the past in question, but also the guiding concerns and perceptions of each generation of history makers. Surprisingly, when I wrote Making Australian History there had been no account of the ways it has changed, who makes history, and how. That was my starting point for the book.

But when it came to writing, it seemed there were more questions than answers: Where does Australian history even begin? With Deep Time? With those early colonial accounts of New Holland? And who are Australia’s historians?

History making has taken place in what we now call Australia for thousands of generations, but the History discipline has also been part of the architecture of its colonisation, policing whose stories can be told and by whom. We also know that history can play a vital role in truth-telling and reconciliation, as the Uluru Statement from the Heart has advocated. I wrote this book because I wanted to tell the story of ‘Australian history’—with all its messiness and possibility.

Professor Anna Clark is an award-winning historian, author and public commentator. An internationally recognised scholar in Australian history, History education and the role of history in everyday life, Anna’s most recent books are The Catch: Australia’s Love Affair with Fishing (2023) and Making Australian History (2022). She is currently Professor of History at the University of Technology Sydney.
1.45 pm NETWORKING LUNCH
2.35 pm EXHIBITOR PASSPORT PRIZE DRAWS
2.50pm VCAA UPDATE: VCE HISTORY
Adam Brodie-McKenzie, Curriculum Manager (History and Civics), Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority
3.15 pm SESSION 3: Please choose one workshop from this session.
F3.1 Beyond Ethnography: Sources for Investigating Deep Time Australia
Dr Georgia Stannard, La Trobe University
LEVELS 7–8
F3.2 The Black Death: Keeping the Grimly Won Gains
Lorenzo Warby, Multisensory (Medieval) Education
LEVELS 7–8 | VCE EMPIRES
F3.3 From Peter I to Putin: Russian Imperialism and Ukraine
Andrew Pyrcz, Lyndale Secondary College
VCE EMPIRES | VCE MODERN HISTORY | VCE REVOLUTIONS
F3.4 Making the Big Six Your Big Six
James Brown and Charlene Landvogt, Scotch College
GENERAL | BYOD
F3.5 Understanding the Delian League through Evidence and Research
Namrata Shipstone, Melton Christian College
VCE ANCIENT HISTORY | BYOD
F3.6 There’s a Poem for That!
Gordon Brown, University High School
GENERAL | BYOD
4.15 pm SOCIAL HOUR
Meet the Author! Duncan Wright, author of HTAV Publishing’s new Teaching Ancient Australia.

Please note: The views and advice presented at HTAV events are not necessarily the views of HTAV. Teachers should use their professional judgement to decide whether to implement or apply what they learn.

Some presenters may use modified extracts from the Victorian Curriculum F–10. These may include the work of other authors. The VCAA does not endorse nor verify the accuracy of the information provided and accepts no responsibility for incomplete or inaccurate information. You can find the most up to date version of the Victorian Curriculum at victoriancurriculum.vcaa.vic.edu.au.

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Sponsors & partners

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  • National History Challenge - Sponsor Logo
  • Education Victoria - Sponsor Logo

We acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the First Australians and Traditional Custodians of the lands where we live, learn and work. The HTAV Office is located on the lands of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation. These lands were never ceded. We pay our respect to their ancestors and Elders, past and present.

Please note: Members of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities should be aware that the HTAV website may include images or names of people now deceased.